Davis Montgomery / Government and Community Relations Manager and Adam Fischer / Greensboro Department of Transportation Director

Investing in Electric Vehicle Infrastructure

For the past decade, Duke Energy has been active in building hundreds of public charging stations at parking decks, libraries and shopping areas. That infrastructure is needed as electric vehicles (EV) become a growing part of the nation’s auto fleet.

That effort will continue in 2017 as more than 200 public EV charging stations are being installed under Duke Energy’s $1.5 million “EV Charging Infrastructure Project” in North Carolina.

Stations are planned in almost 50 counties around the state. The project received overwhelming interest, with more than 500 charging stations requested.

Recipients have the ability to put the charging stations in a location of their choice – and operate them how they see fit.

More than 200 public EV charging stations are being installed under Duke Energy’s $1.5 million “EV Charging Infrastructure Project” in North Carolina.

Also part of the project, a $450,000 grant from Duke Energy will help Greensboro’s Department of Transportation install an electric charging station for a future influx of all-electric buses. The rapid-charging station can replenish a bus battery array in seven to 10 minutes.

The Greensboro Transportation Authority is transitioning its fleet of 47 diesel buses to all-electric vehicles. Over the next 10 years, the city plans to pair $4.5 million in voter-approved bonds with federal funds to replace diesel buses that have met or exceeded their useful life.

Electric buses have no tailpipe emissions and are up to four times as economical to operate as conventional buses. Greensboro could have its first two or three electric buses on the streets by 2018.

Both programs were part of a 2015 settlement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and various environmental groups.